John updike essay on emerson

Varied and ambitious as Mr. Updike's novels are - "The Centaur," for instance, used Greek myths to illuminate a son's love for his father, and "The Coup" conjured up an African kingdom called Kush - they do share an autobiographical impulse that surfaces in certain dominant motifs. Afflicted by a sense of their own mortality, his heroes are given to existential doubts; they are fascinated by suffering as a kind of Christian testing ground, and they hunger for salvation, even as they submit, somewhat guiltily, to the demands of the flesh. As the author, himself, observes, they "oscillate in their moods between an enjoyment of the comforts of domesticity and the familial life, and a sense that their essential identity is a solitary one - to be found in flight and loneliness and even in adversity." — Michiko Kakutani

John updike essay on emerson

john updike essay on emerson

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john updike essay on emersonjohn updike essay on emersonjohn updike essay on emersonjohn updike essay on emerson